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Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 227 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 8:42 pm 
The following is a list of problems found at the University during the audit for 2015-16, they include spending on University promotional items from a federal grant which is not allowed, overspending the athletic budget, not maintaining adequate inventory lists and several others. All the info comes directly for the audit report.


Funding Agency: Department of Health and Human Services CFDA#: 93.596 Program: Child Care Development Fund Pass Through

Entity: New Mexico Children Youth Families Department 2015-001 Unallowable Costs –

Compliance (Significant Deficiency, Noncompliance with Federal Awards) Questioned Costs: $17,150

Condition – During our expenditures test work of this program we noted certain charges that appeared to be unallowable costs. In our sample of 44, we questioned two invoices related to purchases that were from the same vendor. We reviewed the list of expenditures for other items purchased from this vendor and noted no additional items. The invoices included various items branded with the logo of the University program that received federal funding under a subrecipient award from the State of New Mexico Children, Youth, and Families Department. These items were given away to attendees of trainings hosted by the University program.

Criteria – The Office of Management and Budget Circular A-21 – Cost Principals for Educational Institutions (“Circular A-21”) details certain costs that are not allowed to be charged to federal or matching funds including the costs of promotional items and memorabilia, costs of advertising and public relations designed solely to promote the institution, contributions or donations, including cash, property and services, made by the institution, regardless of the recipient, and the costs of selling or marketing any products or services of the institution.

Cause – University personnel did not adhere to the requirements of Circular A-21. Effect – It appears that certain expenditures may not be allowed under Circular A-21. We noted a total of $17,150 of questioned costs



2015-002 Best Obtainable Price – (Other Noncompliance)

Condition – During our expenditure test work we noted two instances out of the 44 tested where it appeared the University may not have received the best obtainable price for the purchase of goods. In one instance, the University incurred $315 of shipping fees for goods and services purchased from an out-of-state vendor. The items purchased appear to be available locally. In the second instance, the University, near the end of the year, purchased an unusually large amount of office supplies. The University is now renting storage buildings to house, in part, the office supplies purchased.

Criteria – NMAC 1.4.1.50 indicates that a state agency may procure services, construction or items of tangible personal property having a value not exceeding twenty thousand dollars by issuing a direct purchase order to a contractor based upon the best obtainable price and in accordance with any procedures or processes set forth by the state purchasing agent.

Cause – A Program of the University wanted to use funding available in the current year and was either unwilling or unable to obtain a purchase order or use the p-card to make the purchases.

Effect –A Program of the University appears to have overpaid for certain goods. Because the Program purchased an abundance of office supplies that it could not reasonable maintain, it continues to pay for storage that would otherwise be unnecessary. Recommendation – Ensure the Program only buys goods that will be used reasonably soon after purchase. Require that all purchases be made locally whenever possible to avoid shipping costs.


2015-003 Annual inspection of Fixed Assets (Other Noncompliance)

Condition – During our capital asset test work we noted that a comprehensive physical verification of capital assets had not been performed recently. In addition, the capital asset inventory sheet does not include the asset number , description, location, manufacturer name, model number or name, serial number or VIN, estimated useful life, acquisition date, cost and/or fund for every item on the list.

Criteria – Section 12-6-10(A) NMSA 1978 requires each agency to conduct an annual physical inventory of movable chattels and equipment on the inventory list at the end of each fiscal year Cause – University personnel have failed to perform a timely physical verification of capital assets. Additionally, University personnel have failed to maintain the capital asset inventory list with all pertinent information.

Effect – Without adequate records and a periodic physical verification processes, University property can get misplaced and its disappearance not be discovered timely. Rec


2015-004 Procurement – (Other Noncompliance)

Condition – During our test work of a sample of 58 items, we noted one instance where University personnel negotiated and executed a contract for goods exceeding $60,000 without regard to the State mandated procurement process.

Criteria – Pursuant to NMSA 1978 Section 13-1-102, all procurement shall be achieved by the competitive sealed bids method or the competitive sealed proposals method unless the purchase can be achieved pursuant to sections 98- 100 and 102-103. The contract in question did not qualify as a purchase that could be achieved by other sections as outlined in the Procurement code and thus must be achieved by the competitive sealed bids method or the request for proposals method.

Cause – University personnel relied on a third party statement that the purchase fell under an existing State contract rather than performing due diligence. Ultimately, University personnel failed to comply with the State Procurement Code by not obtaining competitive sealed bids or competitive sealed proposals from potential bidders.

Effect – The University violated State statues. The University may have paid more than necessary for the purchased goods.


2015-005 - Budget Overspending (Other noncompliance)

Condition We noted that the University overspent its approved budget in combined unrestricted and restricted expenditures budget in the following expenditure categories:
Auxiliary enterprises $ 40,664
Intercollegiate athletics 28,968
Retirement of indebtedness 88,318

Criteria Per statute 5.3.4.10 NMAC, total expenditures may not exceed amounts shown in the approved budgets. Adequate internal controls to minimize budget overspending should ensure that budgets are not exceeded by any amount. The point in the disbursement cycle in which the transaction should be cancelled if budget is not available is at the beginning with the purchase request.

Cause Expenditures were approved for payment when budgeted funds were not available. Budget adjustment request was not completed to cover the increase in expenditures.

Effect Overspending of the budget could result in a shortfall of cash funds.


2015-006 Budget Adjustment- Other Matters

Condition – The University sent a budget adjustment request (BAR) to the Department of Higher Education (HED). The information upon which the BAR was based was prepared as intended. The actual BAR contained one or more errors which caused the BAR approved by HED to be incorrect.

Criteria – Proper accounting procedures implicitly contain a level of care necessary to generate and record accurate information. Additionally, proper procedures include a review process to insure the propriety of generated information.

Cause – University personnel didn’t exercise adequate care during the preparation of the BAR. The review process in place at the University failed to detect the error.

Effect – The final approved BAR included incorrect balances. R


2015-007 Late Audit- Other Matters

Condition – The University implemented GASB 68 in the fiscal year 2015. The retirement organization sent an original worksheet to calculate the amount, but sent out an amended worksheet that management did not receive which resulted in the financial statements being rejected and not meeting the New Mexico Office of the State Auditor’s deadline of November 15, 2015.

Criteria – Per Sections 2.2.2.9(C) and 2.2.2.13 (A) NMAC Audit Rule 2015 Requirements for Contracting and Conducting Audits of Agencies, the State Auditor determined that it was not completed in a sufficient manner.

Cause – An amended worksheet that would have resulted in the correct financial statements being turned in were not sent to the University.

Effect – The University was late in filing their financial statements


2014-002 Stale Dated Checks (Other Noncompliance)

Statement of Condition – During our test work of cash and cash equivalents, we reviewed the outstanding checklist for the accounts payable account and noted the University has outstanding checks greater than one year of $11,297.28. This finding has not been resolved from the previously issued June 30, 2014 financial statements due to the change in personnel during the year.

Criteria – Good accounting controls require the University to remove stale dated checks or if appropriate follow New Mexico Uniform Unclaimed Property Act (1995) [7-8A-1 to 7-8A-31.

Cause – The University was aware of the stale dated checks, but had not addressed them.

Effect –The University may not in compliance with New Mexico Uniform Unclaimed Property Act (1995)


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 8:40 pm 
Western is changing but the change will not benefit Silver City.

Western is moving to an online school. In 2011 only 19% of the classes were online, now over 40% are on line with plans for even more.

Only about 50% of undergraduate students take all their classes in face to face classes. Only about 20% of graduate students take their classes in face to face classes.

Not only do online students not come to Silver City and not spend money here, there is no requirement that the online faculty live in the Silver City area, they can live anywhere.

Even if the administration promise of increasing enrollment to 5,000 students came true the number of students actually taking classes at the Silver City campus would hardly increase. Those people hoping for business from Western students will be disappointed.

Right now the number of students taking face to face classes at the Silver City campus is about half of what it was 20 years ago.

In the future as Western becomes more and more committed to online education, it will become less and less of an economic factor in Silver City and Grant County.

To be a player in online education a school has to advertise. Western is spending about $800,000 on marketing this year.

President Shepard has said he knows where the University is going and that appears to be to mimic Southern New Hampshire University,with a small physical campus and most of the students online. That will benefit the University administration but not the economy of Silver City.


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 Author: curious2
PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2016 10:43 am 
Al, How many legislators do you know of who sincerely care about this ( and other issues ) at WNMU? How many members of board of regents do you know who care about this?


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 Author: samarpan
PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2016 12:23 pm 
Thanks, Al, for this information about increasing online classes. Besides having a negative effect on the Silver City economy, I wonder if a shift to online classes might negatively effect the ability of WNMU to realize its officially stated core mission:

WNMU engages and empowers learners in a multicultural, inclusive, creative, and caring community of teaching, scholarship/research, and service

While I don't doubt the ability of online classes to meet academic learning objectives, the WNMU mission is much broader. It seems to me that face-to-face has advantages when it comes to creating a learning environment that is a "caring community" which is "engaged and empowered" to provide "service."

If enrollment goes up to 5,000 through increased online classes, would current faculty be expected to shoulder the increased work load? Or would additional online instructors have to be added?


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2016 10:14 pm 
To get an idea of where Western is going here is a report on a speech President Shepard gave in Las Cruces.

Las Cruces Rotary Club 1-15-2014

Howard Ness introduced our speaker, President of Western New Mexico University (WNMU), Dr. Joseph Shepard. Howard Ness is an alumnus of WNMU and serves on the WNMU Foundation Board where he has become acquainted with Dr. Shepard. Dr. Shepard comes to WNMU from Florida Gulf Coast University where he held senior leadership positions for 15 years. Florida Gulf Coast U. was literally started from scratch in a swamp and is now a significant university. Dr. Shepard spoke of how he believes that we are on the edge of an educational revolution that will be caused by advances in the disruptive technologies associated with the “digital age.” These changes will lead to the automation of many of the educational processes and the conversion of many courses to commodities administered and delivered electronically by technical staff rather than by faculty. Universities, particularly in New Mexico, must get on board with this or they will not survive. New Mexico has a significantly larger number of Universities and Community Colleges with respect to its population than most other states. Higher education in New Mexico as it now exists is unsustainable. He spoke of three universities that have found success through electronic distance education. These are the Grand Canyon University, the University of Phoenix and Southern New Hampshire University. Dr. Shepard also spoke of the role of athletics in the university and the need to continue to support the traditional “on campus” student.

There were a number of questions. Christopher Dulany commented that the distance education courses that he has taken lacked meaningful interaction and were disappointing. He questioned how this could be overcome. Dr. Shepard explained that two of the “disruptive technologies” that are about to emerge in this area are simulation and immersion. This is where the student at a distance is in a realistic virtual classroom with other students and the professor, none of whom are in the same physical location. This sort of situation has been demonstrated in the medical industry. He also related that realistic simulated spouses are now happening in parts of Asia. Research has shown that if the simulation is sufficiently robust, the human brain reacts in the same manner as if the person were in the actual situation.

Notice that technical staff will "teach" many of the classes. Actually software will teach the class the technical staff will answer question at a call center.


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 Author: Bruce
PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2016 10:54 pm 
Sounds like WNMU should move from live football to digital football. That would be more exciting for its distance students, who could participate regardless of gender or size. As a pioneer, the team could get a head start and have a better record than the live team.

Bruce


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 Author: samarpan
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 5:31 am 
"Sounds like WNMU should move from live football to digital football."

Yes, and other sports activities could also go digital. That would save lots of transportation costs and coaching salaries.

If digital is the future, I wonder if the university accepts digital Bitcoin payments for tuition and fees.


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 Author: ynotwrite2
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 8:55 am 
little doubt, in the coming decades, human's relations with digital equipment will intensify. the traditionalists and luddites will, as historically, push back against the tide.
good luck with that!

Dr Shepard seems well aware of the historic trend, and if you look at the contribution WNMU , its staff and students , make to this community both economic and cultural, insight into the thinking of the leader of the organization is helpful, and necessary.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 2:44 pm 
Just a couple of more topics:

To see how student activities in Silver City have declined, the number of admissions to Western’s athletics events has declined by 50% since 2011.

The University has closed Ritch Hall eliminating 96 beds, leaving only 392 beds. Looks like the University is not planning on an increase in students living on campus.

Last year the University increased tuition by 5%, producing about $350,000, to be used for scholarships to outstanding freshman. Only 10 scholarships were awarded for a total of about $60,000. Where did the rest of the money go?

To be successful in online education the University must spend a large amount on marketing. This year the University is spending at least $800,000. To even get close to breaking even the University needs to recruit at least 300 new FTE’s. That’s an increase of 15%.

It appears that the University is getting out of the education business and going into the entertainment business.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Mon Jul 18, 2016 5:37 pm 
Money magazine has listed the 705 best colleges out of the nearly 2000 colleges. Money rated them by the education provided, affordable price and preparing students for a rewarding career.

Western New Mexico did not make the list, but then neither did any state school in New Mexico. However, all the state schools in Arizona made the list.

Schools were excluded from the list if they had graduation rates below the median or had financial difficulties or fewer than 500 undergraduates.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2016 9:05 am 
Since graduation rates play a large part in being listed, here are the bachelor graduation rates for New Mexico schools:



………………………………..after 4 years…………………..after 6 years
NMIMT…………………………..20%................................49%
NMSU…………………………….13%................................43%
UNM………………………………15%.................................47%
ENMU……………………………..16%................................32%
NMHU……………………………..6%..................................18%
WNMU…………………………….4%..................................21%


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 Author: curious2
PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2016 10:36 pm 
Hello Al,
I am curious would it make a meaningful difference in percentages of those students who finish their degrees in 4 years if we include a factor whether a university accepts students who need remedial studies. For example: Do NMSU, or UNM accept students who need developmental studies? Majority of students at WNMU need developmental English ( reading, and writing ), and developmental math which normally takes them about two semesters of work, so it is natural for such students to complete their degrees in at least 5 years. How would those percentages change if we add the time some students take at Dona Ana Community College before they are accepted at NMSU for example? What about UNM?


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2016 4:07 pm 
NMIMT, UNM, NMSU and ENMU all have admission requirements. NMHU and WNMU are open enrollment. You can see the difference in graduation rates between those with admission requirements and those without.

As far as remedial classes are concerned, looking at them from the tax payer’s point of view, I pay to teach the information to the students in high school. The students pass the courses, graduate from high school, but when they go to college the students find out they can’t pass the placement test, so I have to pay again for the students to take the same information they should have learned in high school. The student’s take up educational resources and only 1 in 5 graduate in 6 years. If you extend the time to 8 years, only about 1% more graduate. Instead of an educational institution Western looks like an institution of failure. Seems like we need some new ideas so that 80% of students don’t flunk out or drop out.

It would seem reasonable for the University and the local school districts to get together and work out a system so that high school graduates could pass the placement tests. It doesn’t make sense to teach the same information twice. Western did not have remedial classes in the 70’s. In the 80’s the Math Department tried this for Mathematics but neither the University administration nor the local school districts were interested.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2016 4:23 pm 
Gabrielle Begay has resigned as student regent from the Western New Mexico University Board of Regents on Aug 5, 2016. No press release from the University.

It appears that the University will be without a student regent until about March of next year. President Shepard will nominate three students for the position, the governor will pick one of them to nominate to the Senate.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2016 10:18 pm 
Interesting fact from the 2016-17 Western's budget

Total Faculty salaries....$9,651,421

Total Administration and staff salaries...$10,835,755

Looks like teaching and education is not the most important activity of the University


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 Author: samarpan
PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 10:44 pm 
Al, another way to look at this is that WNMU is a leader in providing faculty with adequate support in its teaching mission. What would WNMU gain if it had a lopsided faculty to administration/staff ratio where students were not found, student services were lacking, and the faculty were not adequately supported in their teaching mission?

It is a bit simplistic and shortsighted to divide all WNMU employees into good faculty and bad administration/staff. Administration and staff had to expand to provide a vital IT department and faculty support for distance education, a sector nonexistent decades ago; to provide remedial and admissions staff to meet WNMU's open enrollment goal to make education available to all; and to recruit new students (just to maintain an enrollment equilibrium these last five years) in a highly competitive higher education environment.


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 Author: crow
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:46 pm 
What we are missing here is a comparison of staff to faculty in terms numbers of employees in each category. We know the Staff ranges from over paid admin to under paid grounds keepers. I've often wondered what the percentage difference between top paid and lowest paid is.

In an earlier post Al quoted Pres Shepard as thanking the faculty and staff for being so good he got a bonus that got him over a quarter of a million $$ this year....? Did anybody else responsible for his bonus get a raise or bonus? I don't think so. This is a problem with the economic system in general and the system of business this and other universities teach and practice and their business professors advocate.


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 Author: eric casler
PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 9:30 am 
For whatever it's worth: as "Biology Lab Director" at WNMU, I am a STAFF member... and 95%+ of my work is teaching.

It might be useful to delve more deeply into the staff/faculty dichotomy that's being casually tossed around here. "Staff" and "administration" are not synonymous.

Eric Casler


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2016 9:40 pm 
If 95% of your work is teaching the University is taking advantage of you. You should be given a faculty contract with the rights that go along with being a faculty member.

Your work should become more interesting when the new overtime rules come in and you are paid by the hour and you cannot work more than 40 hours a week, even at home, unless your paid overtime. The rules on how you keep tract of your teaching hours should be interesting.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 4:12 pm 
Who really teaches to classes at Western?

According to the 2017 University budget Western has 106 regular full time faculty. It, also, budgets for 106 adjunct faculty FTE’s ( a faculty FTE is 12 credit hours). Adjunct faculty is educational talk for part time faculty. The adjunct faculty is budgeted at $22,450 per year, less than half the salary of full time faculty.

So if you take a class at Western the odds are 50-50 that your instructor will be a part time teacher. If you’re taking a beginning class the odds are even higher that your teacher will be part time.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 9:33 pm 
Why I have reservations about enrollment reports from Western:

This is an enrollment report given by the administration to the Regents at their Sept. 21, 2012 meeting:

Census Date
………………………….Fall 2011………………………….Fall 2012
Head Count…..………3,331………………..………………3,787
FTE’s………………………2,168………………………..……..2,355

This report resulted in a $25,000 bonus for the President.


This is the Performance Goals 2012-13 given by the administration to the Regents at their Sept. 9, 2013 meeting:

Census Date
………………………….Fall 2011………………………….Fall 2012
Head Count…..………3,356………………..………………3,793
FTE’s………………………2,757………………………..……..2,997

This report resulted in a $30,000 bonus for the President.

The head counts are about the same but the FTEs are way different. Both sets of data were given to the Regents but one of them must be wrong, but it was never corrected.

So how does anyone have any confidence in enrollment reports given by the University administration?


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 Author: Bruce
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2017 10:14 pm 
About six months ago in a discussion of university sports I suggested that WNMU should "move from live football to digital football. That would be more exciting for its distance students, who could participate regardless of gender or size." This was intended as a joke. But apparently the joke is becoming real at some universities:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/19/spor ... CD&gwt=pay

WNMU should have got ahead of this trend back when I suggested it.

Bruce


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 Author: sh1
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 10:54 am 
Not sure there's a fan base for video game football, Bruce, but the kids would have fun playing. On the non-virtual side, dropping football and picking up baseball instead makes eminent sense. People in this area love baseball, it's far less dangerous, and Western might even win a few more games. I understand there's state level money that sustains football scholarships, etc., that would be lost if football were dropped -- I don't know if that money could be shifted to baseball. And since the football team makes up a significant chunk of the dorm population, there are likely fears that the financial impact of dropping football would be compounded by a hollowing out of the live-on-campus student body. So I don't expect any movement on your proposal or the many other folks' proposals to abandon football. Unless the liability insurance for concussions becomes too expensive. Shelby


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 Author: SMB
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 7:13 pm 
Western had a decent baseball team when we first moved here eons ago. Might be time for another one.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 8:50 pm 
SMB: About 30 years ago Western’s baseball team received a mention in Sports Illustrated for having the most consecutive loses of any college baseball team ever. If I remember correctly the team lost every game for more than three years.

Sh1: There is no state money intended to only fund football. This year the state funded the Athletic Department with about $1.8 million, they also got over $600,000 from student fees.

Western has a little over 200 students on athletic scholarships. About 100 are on the football team. Another 16 are foreign students that play tennis. State law allows Western only 140 athletic scholarships for tuition and fees only. Western gives its athletes only partial scholarships. The law would allow Western to give a total of $930,160 in scholarships but only gives out $785,604. That means Western gives each athlete an average of about $3,800. Tuition and fees for a year are $6,644.

It costs about $20,000 per student athlete for tuition, fees meals, housing, books, ect. So the total cost for the 200 athletics is about $4 million, the Athletic Department picks up less than $1 million. The rest comes from various financial aid programs run by the University. Western has 392 beds in the dorms, 300 were occupied in the Fall 2016.

As for injuries, Western does not pay for any injuries for its student athletes. Every athlete has to have private health insurance that covers intercollege athletics. The athlete is responsible for all co-pays and deductibles, even if they’re injured in a scheduled game.


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 Author: timmatthes
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:34 pm 
I seem to remember a spell, in the late eighties or thereabout, when Western had a very successful baseball team, sending a few players on to the pros. The coach moved on, a president who pushed football moved in, a big financial deficit in the athletics ensued and baseball was cancelled, ostensibly because of Title IX issues.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 6:27 pm 
Tim: Actually the deficit was not in the Athletic Department it was in what is now called Campus Recreation and its still there. Campus Rec is still over $200,000 in the red. Ex-president Galantine put every athlete on the Campus Rec payroll even though Campus Rec had almost no income. Not only that he burned up cash so fast that the University ran out of money to buy postage stamps. There was a big bin in the mail room filled with University correspondence that could not be mailed because of lack of money for postage. The faculty approached the regents about these problems but was told that it was only an accounting problem. The regents even went to the length of voting confidence in President Galantine in a closed meeting for which the regents were admonished by the AG’s office for violating the Open Meetings Act.


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 Author: timmatthes
PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 2:11 pm 
Ah, yes, I remember that the offensive coordinator in football was in charge of the pool and the lifeguards were all jocks.


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 Author: crow
PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 3:32 pm 
The history of WNMU Presidents and regents has been pathetic but I'd rather go back to football. There have been very interesting things happen in the past couple of weeks which may sink another nail in the coffin for student football:

1. The NM Legislature has before it a bill, SB 38 BRAIN INJURY TRAINING FOR STUDENT ATHLETES. Whats interesting is that finally both the medical profession and the powers that be are coming clean and admitting that concussions are brain damage and that this bill extends the training all the way to the parents. Whats missing is the fact that brain damage can begin long before a concussion. Remember the NFL issues that brought to light a kind of brain damage can only be found through an autopsy and is marked by sudden outbursts of violence in its sufferers.

2. The [urlhttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6552a2.htm?s_cid=mm6552a2_e]CDC released a report on the number of deaths due to spinal, brain injury[/url] for both high school and college students who play football.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 2:55 pm 
Remediation in New Mexico Universities

Per cent of freshman from New Mexico High Schools and Charter schools that took at least one remedial class in Fall 2015.

NMIMT……0%
NMSU…..24.8%
UNM…….28.7%
ENMU…..38.5%
NMHU…..27.6%
NNMC…..49.2%
WNMU….59.4%

Looks like the “quality” of freshman coming to Western is lower than at other universities. What does the above sat about the public schools?


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 Author: samarpan
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 2:18 am 
Al, WNMU is providing more students with remedial education than any other NM university. The word education comes from the Latin word "educere" which means to "bring out, lead forth," from ex- "out" + ducere "to lead" ... By providing remedial classes to freshmen, WNMU is providing remedial students with an opportunity to bring out their best, to bring out their full potential.

Thank you for providing the numbers to show that WNMU is doing more of that hard work of remedial education, work that needs to be done, than any other NM university.


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 Author: crow
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:59 am 
Good for WNMU, everybody who wishes more education should have it available. And it should be free to all without acquiring a burdensome debt be begin their life with. I hear people say "oh we can't afford that, we can barely even afford k-12". How many multi-billion dollar bombers would we have to sacrifice to promote life and education over death and destruction?


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:04 pm 
Back in August 2016 Dr. Findley, at the time the VP of Business Affairs, posted the 2016-17 University budget on the Western web page. Dr. Findley was an open person that believed in the transparency of University operations. Perhaps that was her downfall.

As we all know Dr. Findley’s contract was not renewed in December 2016. In the non-academic world we call it fired. Right after her contract was not renewed the 2016-17 budget disappeared from the web site and was replaced with the 2015-16 budget.

The 2016-17 budget contained the actual expenditures for 2015-16 year. For example, marketing was budgeted at $100,020 with the actual expended at $787,527 in 2015-16. Is the University trying to hide the actual expenses during 2015-16? Why was the 2016-17 removed? The 2015-16 budget is of no use to anyone.

Lucky for me, thanks to Dr. Findley I have a copy of the 2016-17 budget.


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 Author: Used2B
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:00 pm 
I'd like to correct some misinformation published in the Daily Press: Dr. Findley's employment contract did not expire in December, 2016. The contract dates were from January 5, 2015 to June 30, 2019. Dr. Shepard chose to terminate the contract early, taking advantage of a paragraph in the contract which states that the President shall have the right to terminate the contract "in the best interests of the University without proof of just cause". The Daily Press has been contacted twice about this, but has not issued a correction.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 11:32 am 
Interesting that the Daily Press will not print a correction. The Press, also, will not print my letters to the editor. Maybe the Press is afraid that it will lose advertising income from the University.


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 Author: crow
PostPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2017 1:19 am 
Thanks for the input Used2B this illustrates 2 issues. First has been my insistence over the years that reporters and writers here be held to a high standard for facts and truth but recognizing that we don't always get it right my 2nd point is why I have structured an open input from our readers that any inaccuracies may be discussed and corrected and we remain the only local News outlet to allow such community input over the last 11+ years.

Al may be right about advertisers, we lost an advertiser because of an article I wrote, which I still stand by, and which so far has still fixed the problem. And I might add, why it is imperative we receive reader contributions to pay the bills.


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 Author: almilligan
PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 4:00 pm 
Western New Mexico resident undergraduate tuition and fees for for 2017-18 increases from $3,322 for 2016-17 to $3,412, while tuition and fees for non-resident undergraduates actually decreases from $7,630 to $7,615.

What do the President and Board of Regents have against the residents of New Mexico?


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Silver City & Southwestern New Mexico Monthly Community Calendar

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Community Events
Week of April 23, 2017

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23
Ecstatic Dance
Original Poetry and Music
Senior Olympics - Golf
Yang-style Tai Chi Chuan 9am
24
Laughter Club at 12:15pm
Hapkido Class
New Hope Al-Anon Family Group
Beginning Tai Chi at Lotus Center
25
Silver City Rotary Club Meeting
Hapkido Class
Compassionate Friends Gathering
Book Talk and Signing with E.J. Randolph
Wine & The Word @The Toad Brewery
ToSC Council Meeting- Agenda
Yang-style Tai Chi Chuan 9am
26
Our Paws' Cause Thrift Store
Hapkido Class
Wednesday Evening Al-Anon Family Group Meeting
Insight Buddhist Meditation
Babytime: Sing & Play
Farmer's Market
Gin Rummy
Golf - Copper Country Senior Olympics
"The Aztec Sun Stone- La Piedra Del Sol"at the Bayard Public
AMP Concerts Presents Septeto Nacional
Silver City Sister Circle Worldwide New Moon Gathering
Beginning Tai Chi at Lotus Center
27
Our Paws' Cause Thrift Store
Volunteer at The Bike Works 3-7pm
Brown Bag: Grant County in the Great War
“Grant County in the Great War”
Pop-Up MakerSpace @ The Public Librar
Blooming Lotus Meditation
AMP Concerts Presents: Septeto Nacional
Pet Central Thrift Store
28
"Disappearing Mining Landscape Of GC" Opens SC Museum
Our Paws' Cause Thrift Store
Poetry Reading with Raven Drake
Women's Al-Anon Meeting: Women Embracing Recovery
Dinner & Staged Reading of "Last Of The Red Hot Lovers"
Yang-style Tai Chi Chuan 10am
Hapkido Class
Pet Central Thrift Store
Community Bike Ride @ The Bike Works
29
Our PAws' Cause Thrift Store
Low Cost Pet Vaccination and Microchipping Clinic
Huachas (washers) Senior Olympics event
Horseshoes (Men) - Senior Olympics
Horseshoes (women) - Senior Olympics
Día de los Niños @ The Public Library
Dinner & Staged Reading of LAST OF THE RED HOT LOVERS










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